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2017-10-04 / Announcements

A time to play


Volunteers from Keller Williams Midlothian partnered with the Roc Solid Foundation of Chesapeake to build a playset for an 8-year-old Midlothian boy being treated for cancer. 
ASH DANIEL Volunteers from Keller Williams Midlothian partnered with the Roc Solid Foundation of Chesapeake to build a playset for an 8-year-old Midlothian boy being treated for cancer. ASH DANIEL On Thursday, Sept. 28, volunteers from Keller Williams Midlothian partnered with the Roc Solid Foundation of Chesapeake to build a custom backyard playset for an 8-year-old Midlothian boy and his family. The boy is currently being treated for Acute Myeloid Leukemia at the Children’s Hospital of Richmond and is expected to be released soon.

The project is one of many undertaken by Keller Williams Midlothian’s associates and sponsors. For these projects, associates spend the day away from their business volunteering their time to worthy causes and organizations in their community.

Roc Solid Foundation was founded in 2009 by pediatric cancer survivor Eric Newman and has become known for its efforts to support children battling cancer, as well as their families. Their flagship program, Play It Forward, is best known for room remodels and playset builds and has completed nearly 250 projects throughout the southeastern United States.

“The treatments these kids undergo are intense, leaving them with little time and energy to enjoy playing like most kids, on a daily basis,” says Newman. “It’s our goal to give hope to these children by allowing them to be carefree for the day.”

Education

More Chesterfield County Public Schools seniors are graduating with advanced studies diplomas than at any point in a decade, according to information released by the Virginia Department of Education. Nearly 58 percent of Chesterfield County’s Class of 2017 graduated with more rigorous advanced studies diplomas. Graduates must earn at least 26 credits to earn an advanced studies diploma in Virginia. Students must earn four English credits, four math credits, four science credits, four social studies credits, three foreign language credits, three elective credits, two health and physical education credits, a fine arts or career and technical education credit and an economics and personal finance credit. A standard diploma in Virginia only requires 22 credits.

Overall, more than 90 percent of Chesterfield County Public Schools students who entered ninth grade in 2013 graduated in four years, according to the Virginia Department of Education. Matoaca High led the way with a 2-percentage point increase, improving to 93 percent from 91 percent. Both Midlothian and Cosby high schools have the highest percentage, at 98 percent of students graduating on time. School division leadership has worked to put in place several plans to address a slight increase in the dropout rate, which rose to 6.5 percent from 5.9 percent. For more information, visit the school division’s School Quality Profile at schoolquality.virginia.gov/divisions/chesterfield-county-public-schools.

Chesterfield Career and Technical Center @ Hull teacher Christine Hutto recently won the Virginia Department of Education (VDOE) Secondary CTE Award for Region I for her environmental biotechnology class. The class offers students the opportunity to practice authentic learning through labs, data analysis and collaboration with other technical center programs. Students complete assignments to critically think through scenarios like those faced by toxicologists, forensic investigators and environmental scientists, as well as research scientists, and they cooperate with other classes at the technical centers to examine how they can work together to problem solve. The VDOE State CTE Awards recognized 15 exemplary career and technical education programs and partnerships this year.

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